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Charlotte De Araugo with her dog Bailey, who was saved with the help of Pet Medical Crisis Fund. Picture: WAYNE TAYLOR
Charlotte De Araugo with her dog Bailey, who was saved with the help of Pet Medical Crisis. Picture: WAYNE TAYLOR

Christian Tatman, Mornington Peninsula Leader

November 29, 2018 9:30am

BAILEY is a “loveable doofus” who is at the heart of his family — in every way.


A purebred poodle, Bailey’s eyes shine with affection for Rosebud’s De Araugo family.


“He is big, dumb and friendly. He loves his family,” Amanda De Araugo said.

He’s the friendliest dog I’ve ever come across.”

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Family members became increasingly concerned after Bailey began ‘crying’ with pain.

Initially they thought he was cramping or had even strained ligaments in a knee.

But an examination by Dr Ben Porter, from Peninsula Vet Care, later confirmed worst — Bailey’s right back knee was prone to dislocation and he needed major surgery to rectify it.

The surgery was estimated at about $2000 — a tough ask for the De Araugos family, who were already going through tough financial times.

Dr Porter put the family in contact with the Pet Medical Crisis Fund, which helps disadvantaged pet owners prevent their pets from being unnecessarily euthanised when they cannot afford the cost of veterinary care.

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Fund head Jennifer Hunt said the charity donated $800 while Peninsula Vet Care discounted its fee — leaving the De Araugos family with a more manageable $400 to pay.

Ms De Araugo said the family was rapt Bailey had recovered from the surgery and following a period of rehabilitation was back to being his loveable best.

The Pet Medical Crisis Fund relies on public donations to continue its work and is run by volunteers. Donations over $2 are tax deductible.

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